southafrica ANCs draft bill promising to ban alcohol advertising in South Africa may be crossed through after intensive lobbying by the alcohol industry. Instead the political party is now calling for stricter regulations on alcohol outlets. South African newspaper The Saturday Star reports that the alcohol industry’s protests against ANCs plans did not fall on deaf ears. “If the draft bill proceeds in its current form it is inevitable that there will be devastating consequences for the sport and recreation sector,” say the policy discussion documents that have been published in preparation of the national general council in October. These documents now propose to convert a draft law aiming to curb the negative effects of alcohol on the South African society, into a financial bill. These altered plans would see the introduction of a 2.5 percent levy that will support health promotion campaigns, sport, arts and culture as well as educational programmes relating to the dangers of alcohol abuse. Alternatively discussed is the option of allocating government funds towards sports organizations which may be faced with a loss of revenue when alcohol producers are no longer allowed to sponsor them. Saturday Sun 08/22/15   See also: SOUTH AFRICA: ALCOHOL AD BAN DELAYED AGAIN 01/11/14 SOUTH AFRICA: DRAFT BILL BANNING ALCOHOL ADVERTISING APPROVED 09/23/13 SOUTH AFRICA: MINISTERS CLASH OVER PROPOSED BAN ON ALCOHOL ADVERTISING 08/27/13 SOUTH AFRICA: PLANS FOR ALCOHOL ADVERTISEMENT BAN STILL ON 11/19/2012 SOUTH AFRICAN AD INDUSTRY TO FIGHT PROPOSED BAN ON ALCOHOL MARKETING 10/09/2011 SOUTH AFRICAN GOVERNMENT DEDICATED TO FURTHER RESTRICTIONS ON ALCOHOL MARKETING 07/06/2011 SOUTH AFRICA: TO BAN OR NOT TO BAN? 04/26/2011
2015 is the year that the EUs Audiovisual Media Services Directive (AVMSD) will be put under review and is expected to be updated significantly. Currently, the AVMSD is the only law regulating media throughout the whole EU. IOGT-NTO, UNF, EUROCARE and EUCAM  think the 2015 review of the AVMSD is the perfect opportunity to improve the existing law in order to protect minors from the harmful effects of alcohol marketing. Together we invite alcohol-, youth-, and health NGOs to this seminar to become informed about the importance of the AVMSD, the influence of alcohol marketing and to discuss the problems in the curent version of the AVMSD.

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PROGRAM 09:00 Opening 09.10 Welcome and Introduction 09:20 Alcohol sponsorship in the AVMSD, by EUROCARE 09:35 Alcohol marketing attractive to young people, by EUCAM 09:50 Problem of trans-border broadcasts, byIOGT-NTO 10:05 Exposure to alcohol marketing, young people’s perspective, by UNF 10:20 BREAK 10:35 Introduction on the AVMSD REFIT timeline and discussion on strategy to adopt the AVMSD for restricting alcohol marketing. 11:00 Planning the way forward in our strategy 11.30 Conclusions and final remarks VENUE  EUROCARE Office  Rue Archimede 17, 3rd floor B-1000Brussels, Belgium

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logos Eurocare, IOGT, Unf, EUCAM
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2015 is the year that the EUs Audiovisual Media Services Directive (AVMSD) will be put under review and is expected to be updated significantly. Currently, the AVMSD is the only law regulating media throughout the whole EU. IOGT-NTO, UNF, EUROCARE and EUCAM  think the 2015 review of the AVMSD is the perfect opportunity to improve the existing law in order to protect minors from the harmful effects of alcohol marketing. Together we invite alcohol-, youth-, and health NGOs to this seminar to become informed about the importance of the AVMSD, the influence of alcohol marketing and to discuss the problems in the curent version of the AVMSD.

Click here to register for this free event>>

PROGRAM 09:00 Opening 09.10 Welcome and Introduction 09:20 Alcohol sponsorship in the AVMSD, by EUROCARE 09:35 Alcohol marketing attractive to young people, by EUCAM 09:50 Problem of trans-border broadcasts, byIOGT-NTO 10:05 Exposure to alcohol marketing, young people’s perspective, by UNF 10:20 BREAK 10:35 Introduction on the AVMSD REFIT timeline and discussion on strategy to adopt the AVMSD for restricting alcohol marketing. 11:00 Planning the way forward in our strategy 11.30 Conclusions and final remarks VENUE  EUROCARE Office  Rue Archimede 17, 3rd floor B-1000Brussels, Belgium

Click here to register for this free event>>

logos Eurocare, IOGT, Unf, EUCAM
Author: Olivia Belt, Korene Stamatakos, Amanda J. Ayers1 Victoria A. Fryer, David H. Jernigan and Michael Siegel Title: Vested interests in addiction research and policy. Alcohol brand sponsorship of events, organizations and causes in the United States, 2010–2013 Journal: Addiction, 109: 1977–1985. doi: 10.1111/add.12727 AbstractOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA Background and Aims: There has been insufficient research attention to the alcohol industry's use of corporate sponsorship as a marketing tool. This paper provides a systematic investigation of the nature and extent of alcohol sponsorship—at the brand level—in the United States. Methods: The study examined sponsorship of organizations and events in the United States by alcohol brands from 2010 to 2013. The top 75 brands of alcohol consumed by underage drinkers were identified based on a previously conducted national internet-based survey. For each of these brands, a systematic search for sponsorships was conducted using Google. The sponsorships were coded by category and type of sponsorship. Results: We identified 945 sponsorships during the study period for the top 75 brands consumed by underage drinkers. The most popular youth brands were far more likely to engage in sponsorship and to have a higher number of sponsorships. The identified sponsorships overwhelmingly associated alcohol brands with integral aspects of American culture, including sports, music, the arts and entertainment, and drinking itself. The most popular brands among underage drinkers were much more likely to associate their brands with these aspects of American culture than brands that were less popular among underage drinkers. Conclusion: Alcohol brand sponsorship must be viewed as a major alcohol marketing strategy that generates brand capital through positive associations with integral aspects of culture, creation of attractive brand personalities, and identification with specific market segments. Alcohol research, practice and policy should address this highly prevalent form of alcohol marketing.
EUCAM signalised new trends in alcohol marketing in a youth friendly sporting context in 8 European countries. alcohol marketing during the world cup
The recent FIFA World Cup in 2014 was an excellent opportunity for alcohol producers worldwide to promote their products and experiment with new media strategies. A frequency analysis suggests an alcohol brand reference was visible every minute during six analysed matches broadcasted on Brittish TV (1). EUCAM, the European Centre for Monitoring Alcohol Marketing, analysed the various marketing techniques used by the alcohol industry during the World Cup. Examples of these strategies were collected by EUCAM focus points in Austria, Belgium, Croatia, Denmark, Iceland, the Netherlands, Spain and England. The results have been published in a trend report. One of the main conclusions is that the relative share of internet based new media advertising seems to become bigger compared to that of the traditional media.

Cross-media campaigns dominate the alcohol marketing scene 
Cross-media campaigns are certainly no new addition to alcohol marketing. However during the 2014 FIFA World Cup it was striking to see the intensive strategic relationship between all the different forms of media like television, promotional world cup packaging, specific promotional items and social media. 

Another clear trend was that of in-store ads and world cup promotional packaging. These marketing practices were working in tandem to get people attracted to promotional items, which in turn had to lead to more people buying beer in order to obtain these items. 

More exposure of alcohol marketing leads to more adolescent drinkers
The report of EUCAM also strongly shows how the alcohol industry ties sports to drinking alcohol, and how it sells to millions of young and older people the idea that you can’t enjoy one without the other. A proven consequence of this enormous exposure of alcohol marketing is that it leads to adolescents starting to drink earlier and to drink more if they had already started drinking (2-3). Additionally, the ownership of promotional items, such as discussed in this report, correlates significantly with adolescents drinking (2-5).

Need for comprehensive regulations
The report shows that the alcohol industry within the existing alcohol marketing (self) regulation has enough space to create advertising which is attractive to young people and is actively exposed to young people. One conclusion is that regulations aimed at traditional media don’t work for new media, and partially regulating one medium also doesn’t work. This shows the need for a comprehensive measure, such as a total ban on alcohol marketing if we as a society want to protect our children from the harmful effects of exposure to all the different faces of alcohol marketing.

The report can be downloaded here. For questions or comments about the report, please contact Gerard van der Waal at gvanderwaal@eucam.info.

Below is an overview of international alcohol branded TV spots that tied into the World Cup: Worldwide UK UK Belgium Croatia the Netherlands the Netherlands

Author: Bridget Kelly, Louise A Baur, Adrian E Bauman, Lesley King, Kathy Chapman and Ben J Smith Title: Views of children and parents on limiting unhealthy food, drink and alcohol sponsorship of elite and children's sports Journal: Public Health Nutrition / Volume 16 / Issue 01 / January 2013, pp 130-135. Published online: 11 May 2012 A pdf version of this article is freely available here 

AbstractOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA Objective: To determine parents’ and children's attitudes towards food, beverage and alcohol sponsorship of elite and children's sports and the acceptability of policies and alternative funding models to limit this sponsorship. Design: Telephone surveys were conducted with parents in February–May 2011. One child from each household was invited to complete an online survey. Surveys assessed parents’ perceptions about the influence of sponsorship on children and support for limiting sponsorship, and children's awareness of and attitudes towards sponsors. Setting: Randomly sampled households in New South Wales, Australia. Subjects: Parents (n 825) and children aged 10–16 years (n 243). Results: Three-quarters of parents supported the introduction of policies to restrict unhealthy food, beverage and alcohol sponsorship of children's and elite sports. More parents (81 %) supported the introduction of alternative funding models to allow these companies to sponsor sport provided there was no visible branding. Two-thirds of children recalled sponsors of their favourite elite sports team/athlete, with 428 sponsors recalled. Of these, 11 % were food/beverage companies and 3 % were alcohol-related. For 39 % of sponsors, children reported feeling better about the company after it had sponsored a team/athlete. Conclusions: Australian parents support restrictions on unhealthy food, beverage and alcohol sport sponsorship. Children's positive associations regarding sponsors are likely to be linked to brand preferences and usage.