EUCAM is currently updating the 'Regulations on alcohol marketing' section on this website. This section provides information on national, statutory regulations of alcohol marketing in Europe; a description of the restrictions per medium; labelling information; the complaints procedure; and lastly a summary about the regulations on alcohol marketing, including exhaustive, downloadable documents from earlier research projects. Click on this link to go to the Regulations page. 
avmsd draft European news portal Euractiv.com last week obtained a leaked draft proposal of the Audiovisual Media Services Directive (AVMSD), which regulates broadcast and on demand media at the European level. As hoped by many health scientists and NGOs, the proposal underscores the importance of protecting young people against harmful media content, including alcohol advertising. However, worries arise over a proposed stronger reliance on self- and co-regulation of the industry. While the leaked document has stirred media reactions especially concerning a European content tax (nonlinear media providers such as Netflix and ITunes, would be subjected to a tax, from which new European media productions would be funded); a requirement for nonlinear media services to have at least 20% of their programming to be original European content; as well as a relaxation of television advertising times; less fuss is made about what the draft proposal says about the protection of minors against advertisements for salty, fatty, sugary, and alcohol products. So, what does the draft say about alcohol?
Alcohol will be added to 9 paragraph 4: ‘Member States and the Commission shall encourage the development of self-an co-regulatory codes of conduct regarding inappropriate audiovisual communications for alcoholic beverages. Member States are encouraged to ensure that these codes are used to effectively limit the exposure of minors to audiovisual commercial communications for alcoholic beverages. These codes shall be in line with article 4.7 of this directive.
Later on in the proposal, in prefix 34 the example of a good practice is given in the form of including responsible drinking messages as per the code of conduct. This is an example, which has been criticized by scientists and NGOs, because in the hand of alcohol producers the responsible drinking message becomes part of the marketing effort (Journal of Drug and Alcohol Dependence). In the paragraph ‘the choice of the instrument’ the proposal describes why self- or co-regulation have been chosen. The document states that: ‘Such regimes are deemed to be broadly accepted by the main stakeholders and provide for effective enforcement.’ EUCAM would like to point out that in case of the alcohol industry and protection of public health, such schemes are actually proven not to be effective (IAS, Addiction Journal, WHO). Of further interest is that the proposed document will give member states more options to take action against violations of their media regulations from abroad targeted at their own population. For this, see prefix 19, 29 as well as article 4 and article 5 ter. While it is disappointing to learn that the proposal doesn’t go into detail on how to reduce youth exposure to alcohol advertising, EUCAM would like to point out that the leaked draft is likely incomplete as it does not address crucial articles on alcohol advertising from the current version of the AVMSD, namely:
* Article 9. Paragraph 1e: Member States shall ensure that audiovisual commercial communications provided by media service providers under their jurisdiction comply with the following requirements: audiovisual commercial communications for alcoholic beverages shall not be aimed specifically at minors and shall not encourage immoderate consumption of such beverages; * Article 22: Television advertising and teleshopping for alcoholic beverages shall comply with the following criteria: (a) it may not be aimed specifically at minors or, in particular, depict minors consuming these beverages; (b) it shall not link the consumption of alcohol to enhanced physical performance or to driving; (c) it shall not create the impression that the consumption of alcohol contributes towards social or sexual success; (d) it shall not claim that alcohol has therapeutic qualities or that it is a stimulant, a sedative or a means of resolving personal conflicts; (e) it shall not encourage immoderate consumption of alcohol or present abstinence or moderation in a negative light; (f) it shall not place emphasis on high alcoholic content as being a positive quality of the beverages.
Commissioner for Digital Economy and Society Günther Oettinger on Monday the 23rd of May announced on Twitter: EUCAM will give updates on further news on amending the AVMSD as it becomes available. Source: EURActiv.com 05/18/16
russia thumb down The Russian government has approved a proposal to ease the ban on using human and animal images in advertising if they are part of a trademark, Izvestia newspaper reported recently. This amendment is the result of a bill submitted by MP Viktor Zvagelsky submitted a bill in October 2014. The bill would mitigate the ban on using human and animal images in alcohol advertising if they are part of a registered trademark, legal name or the name of a company or sole proprietor. It is believed the amendment will primarily benefit foreign producers of elite alcohol products, which use the images of people and animals as part of their brands more often than their Russian counterparts. According to the official conclusion on the bill, the government has supported Zvagelsky’s proposal, adding that it should be updated. The consumer safety authority Rospotrebnadzor has protested against relaxing the restrictions on alcohol advertising in Russia. Alcohol commercials were prohibited on radio and television as recently as 2013. However a law adopted in late 2014 created exceptions for several types of alcohol advertising. It came into effect on January 1, 2015. Source: RAPSINEWS.com 06/19/2015
r_talking-alcohol-advertising-2-900px-wide claude reviere President Hollande told the wine world meeting in Bordeaux that the law Evin must first be preserved. This was the demand for weeks of the whole health community since the vote of an amendment seriously questioning it. Fortunately, all parliamentarians are not subservient to the lobby of alcohol! While MPs will debate in plenary of the text of the Macron law resulting from the special committee of the Assembly, a resistance is organized to keep the law in its current balance. At the initiative of Madame Delaunay, former minister, an proposal calling to remove the amendment by the wine representative will be tabled in this regard. The organizations that have mobilized for weeks to save the loi Evin, welcome this initiative, including the courage of Mrs Delaunay, MP of Bordeaux, but also a doctor. We also applaud her for being conscious of the damage caused by alcohol. The press has widely reported, most often in a negative way, about the action of a lobby that exploits a part of the national representation for its own purposes. Furthermore, the publication of a supplement of 18 pages of World wines (dated 14 and 15 June 2015) is timely evidence that the defence of the wine country is in no way threatened by the loi Evin in its current edition. We call upon the national representation to follow the path of wisdom advocated by the president and the government, and to preserve the status quo on the loi Evin, balance between protection of health and information on product. Claude Rivière Head of European and International Affairs Association Nationale de Prévention en Alcoologie et Addictologie June 15th, 2015 Want to contribute to ‘Talking Alcohol Advertising’? If you are working in the field of alcohol marketing, wheter as a scientist, policy maker, health care worker or otherwise and want to share your latest results, campaigns or discuss a subject that is currently hotly debated in your country, please contact us at eucam@eucam.info. We would love to hear from you.
ClaudeEvin

Claude Evin, the architect of the now amended Loi Evin restricting alcohol and tobacco advertising in France.

Last week French MPs have voted to amend the country’s strict alcohol advertising laws. This despite the backing of the existing law by the French government, its architect Claude Evin and health bodies all over Europe. Three days before the amendment was voted on in parliament, Health Minister Marisol Touraine urged MPs to vote against it. She warned that the move would undermine the so-called “Evin Law”, named after former health minister Claude Evin, which controls alcohol and tobacco advertising in France. Evin himself told French daily Le Parisien that he was “very worried” about the amendment, which he said would give alcohol companies “almost limitless freedom” to advertise, spelling “the death of the law”. He also agreed that "the powerful ad lobby currently has the controls” and is keen to tap into the "enormous market for [alcohol] advertising, especially for beer and strong alcohol.” The Evin Law, which was passed in 1991 prohibits all alcohol advertising on television or in cinemas. Alcohol ads are allowed in other media, but may not contain lifestyle advertising and must include a message stating that abuse of alcohol is dangerous to one’s health. Moreover, the law bans alcohol companies from sponsoring cultural or sporting events. The passed amendment was introduced by Gérard César, a senator from Sarkozy’s Les Républicains party, who is a wine-grower by profession. The amendment is part of a controversial economic reform law which is being examined by French lawmakers. The Macron Law—named after its chief architect, French Economy Minister Emmanuel Macron—is meant to peel away layers of red tape. It has been stirring controversy and heated debates in Parliament for months. Addressing lawmakers on Monday, Health Minister Touraine said "the Macron Law shouldn’t serve to unravel public health laws”. Source: thedrinksbusiness.com 06/11/15 france24.com 06/09/15
AG_Denn_Privacy The attorney General of the state of Delaware wants to introduce a set of bills with the intent to regulate the privacy and safety of Internet users in Delaware. Included in Mr. Matt Denn’s proposal is a ban on online alcohol and tobacco marketing to children. Denn unveiled his plans, which have bilateral party backing, last Friday in the city of Wilmington. The state attorney general explained the package as a much needed update of online policy: "The internet is an area where the state just hasn't kept up with technology, both in terms of protecting safety and also in terms of protecting basic privacy interest." As such, Den called his plans “an effort to try to catch up to where the technology has gone." The proposal to better protect youngsters online is part of the ‘Online Privacy and Protection Act,’ one of four pieces of new legislation to be introduced. Not only would it restrict websites from marketing alcohol and tobacco to children but also marketing for gambling, firearms and body piercing. House Speaker Pete Schwartzkopf, a Democrat, said this will protect children in the same way that laws decades ago were enacted to stop marketing of cigarettes to teens. “Today, we have children and teens using social media sites and being bombarded with ads for alcohol, tobacco products, weapons and other things that are not appropriate – or even legal – for people that age,” Schwartzkopf told delawareonline.com. Currently it is unclear how this new restriction on online alcohol marketing in the state of Delaware will be enforced exactly. In an interview with newsworks.org Denn reacted on questions about the difficulties of one state enforcing its law against a website operator from somewhere else in the country. He replied that he’s taking the ‘team approach’ and has modeled the legislation on what other states are doing: "If a company is a national company and is having to follow the law already in California or Georgia...then they probably wouldn't have to change much based on our laws." The other pieces of new legislation included in the proposed package would require companies that collect personal information of online users to post a privacy policy explaining how they plan to use that information; as well as creating greater restrictions for the way online data collected about students can be used by internet service operator; and restricting online book service companies from disclosing information about customers’ reading choices. Source: delawareonline.com 04/17/15 newsworks.org 04/17/15  
2015 is the year that the EUs Audiovisual Media Services Directive (AVMSD) will be put under review and is expected to be updated significantly. Currently, the AVMSD is the only law regulating media throughout the whole EU. IOGT-NTO, UNF, EUROCARE and EUCAM  think the 2015 review of the AVMSD is the perfect opportunity to improve the existing law in order to protect minors from the harmful effects of alcohol marketing. Together we invite alcohol-, youth-, and health NGOs to this seminar to become informed about the importance of the AVMSD, the influence of alcohol marketing and to discuss the problems in the curent version of the AVMSD.

Click here to register for this free event>>

PROGRAM 09:00 Opening 09.10 Welcome and Introduction 09:20 Alcohol sponsorship in the AVMSD, by EUROCARE 09:35 Alcohol marketing attractive to young people, by EUCAM 09:50 Problem of trans-border broadcasts, byIOGT-NTO 10:05 Exposure to alcohol marketing, young people’s perspective, by UNF 10:20 BREAK 10:35 Introduction on the AVMSD REFIT timeline and discussion on strategy to adopt the AVMSD for restricting alcohol marketing. 11:00 Planning the way forward in our strategy 11.30 Conclusions and final remarks VENUE  EUROCARE Office  Rue Archimede 17, 3rd floor B-1000Brussels, Belgium

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logos Eurocare, IOGT, Unf, EUCAM
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2015 is the year that the EUs Audiovisual Media Services Directive (AVMSD) will be put under review and is expected to be updated significantly. Currently, the AVMSD is the only law regulating media throughout the whole EU. IOGT-NTO, UNF, EUROCARE and EUCAM  think the 2015 review of the AVMSD is the perfect opportunity to improve the existing law in order to protect minors from the harmful effects of alcohol marketing. Together we invite alcohol-, youth-, and health NGOs to this seminar to become informed about the importance of the AVMSD, the influence of alcohol marketing and to discuss the problems in the curent version of the AVMSD.

Click here to register for this free event>>

PROGRAM 09:00 Opening 09.10 Welcome and Introduction 09:20 Alcohol sponsorship in the AVMSD, by EUROCARE 09:35 Alcohol marketing attractive to young people, by EUCAM 09:50 Problem of trans-border broadcasts, byIOGT-NTO 10:05 Exposure to alcohol marketing, young people’s perspective, by UNF 10:20 BREAK 10:35 Introduction on the AVMSD REFIT timeline and discussion on strategy to adopt the AVMSD for restricting alcohol marketing. 11:00 Planning the way forward in our strategy 11.30 Conclusions and final remarks VENUE  EUROCARE Office  Rue Archimede 17, 3rd floor B-1000Brussels, Belgium

Click here to register for this free event>>

logos Eurocare, IOGT, Unf, EUCAM
Rhone-balloon-advert-web-article An advert for Rhone wines depicting a man holding a red balloon with the slogan ‘au gout de la vie’ – a taste for life – has been successfully banned in France, after a complaint by ANPAA, the national alliance of health professionals and campaigners against alcohol and drug abuse. ANPAA argued that the advert, launched in October 2014, linked alcohol and happiness, which is illegal under France’s Evin law. On the 7th of January, the Tribunal de Grand Instance in Paris ruled that the company could keep on using the image in its marketing, but had to change the slogan. ‘We may use the image without any slogan, or come up with something new, it is still under discussion,’ Arnaud Pignol, general director of Inter Rhone, told wine magazine Decanter. Pignol said he’s glad the judge did not decide to ban the advert altogether, but was also critical of the l'oi Evin: ‘The judge was balanced, and looked at the two parts of the campaign separately. But it shows that the Evin Law is still very tightly and strictly applied, and that there remains much work to be done.’ ANPAA has 15 days to appeal the ruling. Late last year, ANPAA lost a similar case against an advertising campaign for Bordeaux win. Source: decanter.com 01/14/15