By Anthony Colangelo , The Sydney Morning Herald

14 January 2019 — 12:05am

A study of thousands of Australian high school students over more than 10 years has found that exposure to alcohol advertising encourages them to participate in “risky drinking” behaviours.

Alcohol advertising on TV has reduced dramatically in the past decade, but most recent figures suggested Australian teenagers were still being exposed to about nine booze ads a month.

That is nine ads too many, according to experts at VicHealth, Cancer Council Victoria and the Foundation for Alcohol Research and Education (FARE).

Alcohol advertising encourages teens to participate in “risky drinking” behaviours, according to a new study. Credit:Rodger Cummins

Their study has renewed calls to place a total ban on television alcohol advertising during sport, which is only restricted after 6pm on weekends and public holidays.

Outside these times, alcohol advertising is allowed during any sporting event, even if it falls within a time considered to be “children’s viewing hours”.

This includes the Australian Open, beginning on Monday, and other popular television sports like the cricket, AFL and NRL.

Spectators are exposed to plenty of alcohol-related adverts in sport, including on players’ uniforms.Credit:Scott Barbour

The study was conducted on data gathered between 1997 and 2011, and found alcohol advertising on television actually dropped during this period.

But alcohol advertising increased in newspapers, while there was also concern about kids’ exposure to unregulated alcohol messaging on social media.

 

 

 

 

 

Spectators are exposed to plenty of alcohol-related adverts in sport, including on players’ uniforms.Credit:Scott Barbour

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